Rosalinda Voth | 604-250-4996

Sometimes we don't have much choice about selling our home and buying another. Circumstances, such as a job relocation, may have made that choice for us.

 

However, most often the decision to move is discretionary. Sometimes people move simply because they think it's a good idea. They feel that "now" is the right time to find their next dream home.

 

So how do you make that kind of decision?

 

There are, of course, many reasons to make a discretionary move. Usually, those reasons fall into one of two categories: need and want.

 

You may need to find a new home, for example, because you've outgrown your current property. Perhaps you have a growing family and require more space. Maybe you're doing more entertaining and need a larger backyard with a more spacious deck. It could be that the commute to work is arduous and you need to move to a place that's closer.

 

Those "needs" may motivate you to move, but sometimes a "want" plays an important role, too.

 

For example, you may want to live in a quieter neighbourhood or in a newly built home that requires less maintenance. Maybe you simply want a change.

 

If you're thinking of making a move, take a moment to write down a list of your needs and wants. Seeing them on paper will help make the decision easier.

 

Looking for expert help? Call Rosalinda today. 1.604.250.4996

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There are unwelcome guests that most homeowners dread. They come into your house, eat, sleep, make a mess, and never leave willingly. Each one has at least six legs and sometimes flies.

 

They are, of course, insects. They’ve been freeloading in homes since homes were invented. Here are some practical ways to keep these unwelcome guests out:

 

  • Find out how they got in. Look for gaps around windows and doors, and cracks in the basement. If you find a spider web, there's likely an insect entryway nearby.
  • Watch out for standing water near the foundation of your home. Make sure rain gutters drain water well away.
  • Eliminate clutter. Insects love warm, cluttered, moist areas.
  • Check the seal around dryer vents and other vents, pipes and cable wires going through the wall. Reseal if necessary.
  • Rinse recyclables before putting them into a bag or bin. Few things are more tempting to a bug than the dark, moist, sweet insides of an un-rinsed pop can.

 

If you do end up with a serious insect problem, call a professional exterminator. 

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Have you ever driven up to a restaurant and your first impression was disappointing? Perhaps the windows looked dark and gloomy, the façade was worn and unattractive or for some other reason it just didn't look like a tempting place to eat.

 

It could still be a fantastic restaurant – a real gem. But, your first impression has soured your anticipation. If you still walk through the front door, it will likely be with the expectation of being disappointed.

 

This scenario often plays out in the real estate market as well.

 

A buyer drives up to a home for sale and quickly forms an impression based on what he sees "from the curb". That's why you'll hear real estate experts talk about the importance of "curb appeal". It's one of the most important selling points of a property.

 

If you plan to put your home on the market, you obviously want your home to look as attractive as possible from the street. Fortunately, there are many simple things you can do to improve curb appeal.

 

For example, you can trim shrubs and hedges, plant flowers, clean the walkway and driveway, paint the front door and garage door, and clean the exteriors of the windows. All these projects are relatively easy and inexpensive. Yet, each can make a dramatic improvement to how your home looks at first glance.

 

Don't be like the great restaurant that’s hidden behind an unkept façade. Make sure your curb appeal reflects the overall value of your property.

 

Looking for more advice on selling your home quickly and for the best price? Call me today. 604.250.4996

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You would have to visit your local pharmacy or science lab to rival the number of potentially dangerous chemicals in the average home. You likely store everything from fertilizers and acidic cleaners to gasoline and corrosive drain openers.

 

Obviously, it makes sense to ensure that everyone in your home uses and stores such items safely.

 

For example, laundry detergent packs – which have become popular recently – are attractive to children. Keep them locked and out of sight. You should do the same with all laundry products. Even exposure to fabric softener pads can cause skin irritation to a child.

 

Always read and follow the labels on household chemical products. Use and store them as directed.

 

Keep corrosives, such as harsh cleaners and drain openers, separate from other chemicals and in a place where, should they leak, they will cause minimal or no damage.

 

Also, never put a chemical in anything other than its original container. You don’t want to take the chance that paint thinner stored in an old water bottle, for example, is mistaken for water!

 

Finally, make sure you have the phone number to your local Poison Control Center in a handy place, such as your fridge door. (You can find a list of numbers at www.CAPCC.ca in Canada and www.AAPCC.org in the U.S.)

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